45. McKinstry September 7, 1850

[Saturday] "Very cold this morning - water froze. Turned out our cattle and found tolerable grass. This valley is both beautiful and picturesque. On the right the mountains rise abruptly to the region of perpetual snow. The sides in most places covered with scattering pines to the base. Across the river on the left the hills are lower and a range intervenes between us and the Mts. A line of snow all along the west. The valley itself is tolerably level and well clothed with grass. The soil I should call good and could be easily irrigated. We crossed numerous small spring branches coming from the hills, of very pure water running across a gentle slope....


In the afternoon we kept down on the right hand side of the valley, our course about the same as the valley... Passed the Morman Station [Genoa] and several others. This is a picturesque place. Fine pines, one very large one at the station, the camp under it.... Passed 2 m. from the Morman Station some hot springs. They are along under the foot of the hills, the road between them, and are scattered along for more than a mile and form quite a little lake or slough which is hot....


The Pacific Train is now just behind with but 12 passengers and 9 baggage wagons, 4 men to each passenger wagon. They got out of provisions at Salt Lake and bought wheat at 10 dolls. but they were hindered greatly in getting it ground, &c., in fact fooled away their time and their passengers have suffered greatly and now the proprietors, Jerome, Hanson & Smith have nothing to buy with, and each man has to shift for themselves. The passengers pass us daily & some of them say that they have no money to buy provisions with, yet they can pay 50 cts. per drink for brandy. So ends this famous stage line from St. Louis to Cal. that I heard so much about before I started, advertised to carry men through in 60 days at 200 dolls. each. They have been beat by the ox teams. They left St. Joseph May 12th and have been now 113 days out. Saw some of the passengers throwing their clothes into the river."