Carson River Route (Fredericksburg to Placerville)

The Carson River Route (along with the Grizzly Flat Road) is described in a Trails West guidebook which may be available for purchase in the CTIC gift shop or you can purchase it directly from Trails West on their website. They have an online photo tour along the Carson River Route.

Marker CR-37


TO WEST CARSON CANYON

"Thence over a high sloping stony hill (sloping to the river) and down a steep hill to a canon or pass creek, where comes the first tug of war! Through the first range of the Sierra Nevada Mountains" - Giles S. Isham, August 5, 1850


On the reverse side of this marker is the original marker placed here by the Nevada Emigrant Trail Marking Committee, Inc. (NETMC).


CARSON RIVER ROUTE MARKER NO. C.R.R. 25 THE TRAIL LEFT THE BENCH HERE AND TURNED WEST INTO THE CANYON OF THE WEST CARSON RIVER.

Marker CR-38


FIRST CROSSING IN MAD CANYON

"The river here is ... filled with large rocks we crossed on a bridge but expect to ford the next times ... we started through Mad Canyon which is rightly named ... the hardest place for teams I ever saw" - Caroline L. Richardson, September 12, 1852

Marker CR-39


CROOKED TRAIL

"A part of the way the rocks cover the ground so large that it is with the greatest dificulty that we can find a place to drive our waggons through the trail is quite crooked" - Amasa Morgan, July 24, 1849


On the reverse side of this marker is the original marker placed here by the Nevada Emigrant Trail Marking Committee, Inc. (NETMC).


CARSON RIVER ROUTE MARKER NO. C.R.R. 26 SNOWSHOE THOMPSON CAMP. EMIGRANTS PAUSED HERE TO REST IN THEIR STRUGGLE UP THE CANYON TO HOPE VALLEY.

Marker CR-40 / LP-1


HOPE VALLEY

"We immerged from the canon into a pretty valley between two ranges of high mountains. Pretty pine trees were scattered over a small, grass lawn, and a beautiful mountain stream passed through it." - Lorena L. Hays, September 13, 1853


On the reverse side of this marker is the original marker placed here by the Nevada Emigrant Trail Marking Committee, Inc. (NETMC).


CARSON RIVER ROUTE MARKER NO. C.R.R. 27 HOPE VALLEY. EMIGRANTS RESTED IN THIS BEAUTIFUL VALLEY ON THEIR WAY TO CARSON PASS.


This post also has Marker LP-1 of the Luther Pass Route. Use the button below to go that route.

Marker CR-41


LEAVING HOPE VALLEY

"Left camp at eight o'clock and striking due south, passed up the valley over a variety of road, much of it very rough - the mountains are well timbered with a number of varieties of pine, cedar, and fur trees" - G. C. Cone, October 8, 1849

Marker CR-42


RED LAKE

"We have a good road to Red Lake ... at the foot of the dividing ridge then up the steepest hill for a waggon road I ever saw (called by some the Devils Ladder)" - Aretas J. Blackman, August 1, 1849


On the reverse side of this marker is the original marker placed here by the Nevada Emigrant Trail Marking Committee, Inc. (NETMC).


CARSON RIVER ROUTE MARKER NO. C.R.R. 28 RED LAKE. IT WAS A HEROIC STRUGGLE TO HAUL WAGONS UP TO CARSON PASS DIRECTLY WEST.

Marker CR-43


ASCENT TO CARSON PASS

"After dinner we crossed the first mountain. The ascent is half a mile and much like going up the side of a house in steepness, with huge stones in the road, aside the road and all around the road." - Henry Sheldon Anable, September 10, 1852


On the reverse side of this marker is the original marker placed here by the Nevada Emigrant Trail Marking Committee, Inc. (NETMC).


CARSON RIVER ROUTE MARKER NO. C.R.R. 29 KIT CARSON PASS. ELEVATION 8650 FT. FIRST SIERRA SUMMIT TRAIL DESCENDS TO CAPLES LAKE FROM HERE.

Marker CR-44


TO LAKE VALLEY

"While I was in camp, there came along a man who had lost everything. He had one pint of corn meal left. He was without shoes, and his feet were tied up in rags. ... I encouraged him to ... try to go forward." - Margaret A. Frink, August 29, 1850


Margaret's diary can be viewed on Hathitrust.

Marker CR-45


DESCENT TO LAKE VALLEY

"Descended two miles into another valley, in the centre of which is a lake, with several small streams putting into it. Crossed the vally & immediately commenced the ascent of a mountain" - William Wagner, August 7, 1852

Marker CR-46


LAKE VALLEY

"We are now encamped on the margin of the mountain lake. The scenery today has been truly sublime. ... how I wish we had a house to live in now. If it were not for hope the heart would break." - Mary Stuart Bailey, September 26, 1852


The first part of Mary's diary (from Missouri to Wyoming) can be downloaded from the OCTA website.


On the reverse side of this marker is the original marker placed here by the Nevada Emigrant Trail Marking Committee, Inc. (NETMC).


CARSON RIVER ROUTE MARKER NO. C.R.R. 30 CAPLES LAKE. TRAIL CLIMBS UP TO ROCKY RIDGE ON SOUTHERN SKYLINE TO EMIGRANT PASS.

Marker CR-47


SIERRA NEVADA SUMMIT

"We reached the summit where we found the American Flag, with its stars and stripes floating to the breeze, in its usual bold and majestic manner, ... on the lofty peak of the Siera Nevada" - Leander V. Loomis, August 9, 1850


Leander's book can be viewed on Hathitrust.


On the reverse side of this marker is the original marker placed here by the Nevada Emigrant Trail Marking Committee, Inc. (NETMC).


CARSON RIVER ROUTE MARKER NO. C.R.R. 31 EMIGRANT PASS. ELEVATION 9400 FT. HIGHEST POINT REACHED BY EMIGRANT WAGONS IN U.S.

Marker CR-48


SQUAW RIDGE

"We camped last night about one mile from the summit and passed a disagreeable night in consequence of the cold which was severe, compelling us to keep fires throughout the night." - Silas Newcomb, August 30, 1850

Marker CR-49


MARTELL FLAT

"Made the best of our way down the mountain to where we found a spring some 2 miles from the summit Here we stopped for the night and found some grass for our cattle" - Henry W. Starr, September 8, 1850


Henry's diary can be downloaded from the OCTA website.

Marker CR-50


PLASSE TRADING POST

"Met a trader of whom we bought 100 pounds of flour & seventy five pounds of pork ... drove the cattle in a rich valley below w[h]ere there was grass in abundance as well as water there being a fine lake" - John M. Verdenal, October 7, 1852

Marker CR-51


MUD LAKE

"Started at daybreak. ... came to a small lake in the woods with a steep cavernous bluff on one side. Stop here to get our breakfast. 4 miles further Tragedy Spring beside the trail." - Bernard J. Reid, September 19, 1849

Marker CR-52


TO TRAGEDY SPRING

"This morning, we found a grogshop on the road-side, kept by two brothers ... they were out of most kinds of eatables but had plenty of drink. They were located within half a mile of Tragedy Springs" - James S. Shepherd, August 12, 1850

Marker CR-53


TRADING POSTS

"There is a trading post every five miles where you can get the necessaries of life if you have the cash to pay for them. ... came within five miles of the Leak Springs. Passed the Tragedy Spring." - Lewis Francis Beers, September 1, 1852

Marker CR-54


VOLCANO ROAD JUNCTION

"Came to the post office, a canvas and brush tent, a rough postmaster, and forks of the road a little after noon. We took the left, the volcano rout down a long dusty hill." - Asenath Larimer, September 17, 1852

Marker CR-55 / GF-1


LEEK SPRINGS

"Stoped & camped at Leek Springs A beautifull little valley surrounded by large pine & fur trees. The most romantic spot we have yet camped upon." - Mendall Jewett, July 19, 1850


This post is also Marker GF-1 (Grizzly Flat Trail). Use the button below to navigate to that route.


Marker CR-56


ALONG THE DIVIDE

"We reached Lake Spring early this forenoon, then ascending a high mountain ridge, we followed its windings forming a divide until late in the afternoon when we descended to the valley of Camp Creek" - Palmer C. Tiffany, August 21, 1849


Tiffany's diary can be viewed as part of the digital collection of Yale University Library.

Marker CR-57


CAMP CREEK

"Over a rough road brought us to Camp Creek a famous watering place but without grass here we gave our mules water filled our canteens and proceeded on our way rejoicing." - William L. Thomas, August 9, 1849

Marker CR-58


OLD IRON MOUNTAIN ASCENT

"We came to a creek cauled Camp Creek here we watered and drove six miles over the damedst hills or hill it was four miles up it and two down" - William B. Ogle, September 1, 1850

Marker CR-59


OLD IRON MOUNTAIN DESCENT

"We de[scend] a steep mountain. ... the road this morning has been very rough and uneaven, having to ascend a mountain to the top, b[e]ing about a mile and a half and verry steep in some places." - Thomas Christy, August 4, 1850

Marker CR-60


TO SLY PARK

"Here went 3 miles to the left of the road into a fine piece of grass like a meadow where we found hundreds of animals ... we laid down after frying meat on sticks & making tea" - Peter Decker, August 6, 1849

Marker CR-61 / JC-25


JUNCTION

"We moved on ... to where the roads fork. ... the left hand road leads to ... Weberville & the right leads to Hangtown or Placerville. We concluded to take the left hand road ... now we commence a gradual descent" - James G. Shields, August 12, 1850


This post is also the location of Marker JC-25 (Johnson Cutoff). Use the button below to navigate to that route.

Marker CR-62


TO PLEASANT VALLEY

"Continued down the ridge upon which we traveled day before yesterday, occasionally descending deep valleys. ... we reached what the Mormons call 'Pleasant Valley gold diggins.'" - P. C. Tiffany, August 24, 1849


Tiffany's diary can be viewed as part of the digital collection of Yale University Library.

Marker CR-63


PLEASANT VALLEY

"We reached what in our guide book was called 'Pleasant Valley Gold Mines'; where we found two or three tents, and a few men with their gold-washing pans." - Sarah Royce, October 24, 1849

Marker CR-64


DESCENT TO PLEASANT VALLEY

"After descending from this ridge by a long hill ... at twilight entered on as beautiful a valley as ever I laid eyes on called Pleasant Valley." - Peter Decker, August 7, 1849

Marker CR-65


WAGON ROAD JUNCTION

"Came on to the forks of the road - the left hand leading to Sutters Fort & the right hand to. ... Coloma ... we here took the right hand road and went ... through Wevervill came on ... farther to Hang town" - James A. Pritchard, August 11, 1849

Marker CR-66


WAGON ROAD TO PLACERVILLE

"We ... decided to head for Placerville and cast our lot digging gold, and we expect to pass into this place to night, ... we passed ... a good many cradling out gold, and we are all very enthusiastic to get started" - Albert G. Paschal, August 18, 1850

Marker CR-67


WAGON ROAD TO PLACERVILLE

"Entered Pleasant Valley in which are established several trading posts. ... we moved on and ... descended into a valley in which is situated a few log huts & 1 tavern. This place is named Ring[g]old." - James G. Shields, August 13, 1850

Marker CR-68


WAGON ROAD TO PLACERVILLE

"Arrived at Ringgold a little after sunset. Put up at a Dutchman's. Paid 4/-per meal, furnished our own blankets and slept on the floor. [Next day] Went to Weaver[ville], Coon Hollow and Hangtown." - Perry Gee, September 23-24, 1852

Marker CR-69 / JC-30


PLACERVILLE

"This is called 'Dry Diggins' ... more gold has been raised [here] than in any other part of California. Here we made a final stop and unloaded our wagons & felt of a truth that we had at last reached the gold mines." - P. C. Tiffany, August 25, 1849


Tiffany's diary can be viewed as part of the digital collection of Yale University Library.


This post also has Marker JC-30 (Johnson Cutoff Route). Use the button below to navigate to that route.