Greenhorn Cutoff

The Greenhorn Cutoff is described in the Trails West guidebooks California Trail along the Humboldt River. This book may be available for purchase in the CTIC gift shop or you can purchase it directly from Trails West on their website.

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STEEP ASCENT

"Here the old road runs down the canon crossing the river. The one now traveled passes over a mountain and winds among canadas for twelve miles when it approaches the river again" - Lorenzo Sawyer, June 28, 1850

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HIGHEST SUMMIT

"After passing through winding ways runing to all points of the cumpas, we gained the summit at 10 am. We commenced the descent immediately upon arriveing at the top of the hill" - James Pritchard, July 15, 1849

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DESCENT FROM SUMMIT

"After reaching the summit of the mountain we descended by a very gradual declination to a valley which opened on the river" - Joseph Berrien, July 9, 1849


Joseph's diary can be downloaded from the Indiana Magazine of History.

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DRY SUSIE

"We had taken what is called the 'Greenhorn Cut-off,' which required fifteen miles' travel to gain six miles on our journey" - Margaret Frink, July 25, 1850


Frink's diary can be view on Hathitrust.


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HOT SPRINGS

"On the right of the road bunch grass showed water ... & I set down & took a drink of the just tolerable water to slake our almost quenchless thirst caused by marching through the hot sun & clouds of dust" - Peter Decker, July 11, 1849

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SUSIE CREEK

"When we struck the branch [Susie Creek], the road turns southwest, which carried us back almost towards our starting point this morning. We rolled down this ... where we again struck the river"Wakeman Bryarly, July 27, 1849


Wakeman's diary can be viewed on the Internet Archive.

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END OF GREENHORN CUTOFF

"Went on a few miles & came to a canion [Carlin Canyon]. Here the road [Greenhorn Cutoff] leaves the river again & runs among a chain of hills all day. Came to the [Humboldt] river bottom & camped." - Lucena Parsons, May 6, 1851