Grizzly Flat

The Grizzly Flat Road (along with the Carson River Route) is described in a Trails West guidebook which may be available for purchase in the CTIC gift shop or you can purchase it directly from Trails West on their website.

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LEEK SPRING VALLEY

"The road forks here one is a new road passing a new mining place called Grisly Flats but terminating the same place the other does Hangtown. We took the new road which proved a very rough one" - Richard Augustus Keen, July 22, 1852


This post is also Marker CR-55 (Carson River Route). Use the button below to navigate to that route.


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BALTIC RIDGE

"Came over a hill at first this morning saw numerous bear tracks we looked around suspiciously expecting to see owners of so large an impression ... road very mountainous but not rough" - Caroline L. Richardson, September 18, 1852

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TO THE RIVER

"We concluded on taking a new road, leading to Grizly Flat Diging ... rolled over the new road 12 miles the road tremendous dusty and comeing to a very fine stream [Cosumnes River], ... encamped" - William H. A. Johnston, July 29, 1852

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CAPPS CROSSING

"Came down to trading post and camped at foot of mountain on a small creek a branch of the McCosma River [Cosumnes River] ... road midling rough this afternoon but not so hilly we are descending very fast" - Caroline L. Richardson, September 18, 1852

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DUNCAN CORRAL

"Our first work this morning was to climb the mountain which was very steep and equaly as bad as any this side of the summit ... after which our road was on the descent and the smoothest we have had in some time" - Caroline L. Richardson, September 19, 1852

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END OF THE RIDGE

"Camped one mile from Grizzley Flat, where there is some grass. This is the first mining town we reached in California. The hills are cut up, by ditches, cut to convey water to the mining claims." - Patrick Henry Murphy, October 6, 1854

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IN GRIZZLY FLAT

"This morning we went through a mining town called Grizzly Flat, ... it consists of twenty-five houses. The place is cut up a great deal by mining. They have a wooden track rail-road here for conveying logs to the saw-mill." - Patrick Henry Murphy, October 7, 1854